The Chablis Region 

  

Where are we?

Chablis is in Northern Burgundy in the department of the Yonne at a latitude of 47 degrees north. It is almost as far north of Beaune as it is south-east of Paris. The climate is nearer to that of Champagne than the Cote d'Or in Burgundy.

History

The history of Chablis reads very much like the history of France. The area was populated by Gallo-Roman rural settlements, however the first written records go back to 867 AD. While vineyards were established prior to this it was the arrival in 854 of monks, who took refuge in the Abbey of Saint German d’Auxerre, that saw the establishment of a wine industry.

In the Middle Ages wine was exported to England and the region prospered, then the area fell on hard times. Further blows to the wine industry were from the destruction of vines by phylloxera in the 19th century and the ravages of WWI. To add to the area's misfortunes, the bombardment of 15 June 1940 destroyed the historic centre of Chablis. 1949 marked the renaissance of the town and its vineyards. However it was not until the 1960s that frost protection resulted in the growth and expansion to the industry that we know today.

Chablis- a separate region or part of Burgundy. We have treated Chablis and the north as a separate area.

The home of the quintessentially dry white wine that is made exclusively from the Chardonnay grape in a small pocket of 4308 hectares of poor clay soil. So region or sub-region, we hope that you enjoy the area as much as we do.

                                                                                            

The Town

The rebuilt town still has an old-world charm but with a degree of modern convenience. Half-timbered buildings house a range of local and tourist shops.

The town is enjoyable for spending time in shopping and eating, plus there are a number of wine shops that carry a good range of local wine.

 


 

What makes this a great area for wine and food lovers?

Chablis produces great steely, mineral white wines from Chardonnay grapes. These are not your big fruity, oaked new-world Chardonnays, but rather wines that call out to be drunk with food and particularly seafood, shellfish such as mussels, and vegetables such as asparagus. Chablis with hors d'oeuvres, like the featured toasted baguette with asparagus and hollandaise sauce, is the perfect start to a dinner.

 


 

 

 

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